Effect of personalized nutrition on health-related behaviour change: evidence from the Food4Me European randomized controlled trial.

@article{CelisMorales2017EffectOP,
  title={Effect of personalized nutrition on health-related behaviour change: evidence from the Food4Me European randomized controlled trial.},
  author={Carlos Celis-Morales and Katherine M Livingstone and Cyril F M Marsaux and Anna L Macready and Rosalind Fallaize and Clare B O'Donovan and Clara Woolhead and Hannah Forster and Marianne C Walsh and Santiago Navas-Carretero and Rodrigo San-Cristobal and Lydia Tsirigoti and Christina P Lambrinou and Christina Mavrogianni and George Moschonis and Silvia Kolossa and Jacqueline Hallmann and Magdalena Godlewska and Agnieszka Surwillo and Iwona Traczyk and Christian A. Drevon and Jildau Bouwman and Ben van Ommen and Keith A. Grimaldi and Laurence D. Parnell and John N. S. Matthews and Yannis Manios and Hannelore Daniel and J Alfredo Mart{\'i}nez and Julie A Lovegrove and Eileen R Gibney and Lorraine Brennan and Wim H. M. Saris and Michael J Gibney and John C. Mathers},
  journal={International journal of epidemiology},
  year={2017},
  volume={46 2},
  pages={578-588}
}
Background Optimal nutritional choices are linked with better health, but many current interventions to improve diet have limited effect. We tested the hypothesis that providing personalized nutrition (PN) advice based on information on individual diet and lifestyle, phenotype and/or genotype would promote larger, more appropriate, and sustained changes in dietary behaviour. Methods : Adults from seven European countries were recruited to an internet-delivered intervention (Food4Me) and… CONTINUE READING