Effect of neck muscle strength and anticipatory cervical muscle activation on the kinematic response of the head to impulsive loads.

@article{Eckner2014EffectON,
  title={Effect of neck muscle strength and anticipatory cervical muscle activation on the kinematic response of the head to impulsive loads.},
  author={James Travis Eckner and Youkeun K. Oh and Monica S Joshi and James K Richardson and James A. Ashton-Miller},
  journal={The American journal of sports medicine},
  year={2014},
  volume={42 3},
  pages={566-76}
}
BACKGROUND Greater neck strength and activating the neck muscles to brace for impact are both thought to reduce an athlete's risk of concussion during a collision by attenuating the head's kinematic response after impact. However, the literature reporting the neck's role in controlling postimpact head kinematics is mixed. Furthermore, these relationships have not been examined in the coronal or transverse planes or in pediatric athletes. HYPOTHESES In each anatomic plane, peak linear velocity… CONTINUE READING
Related Discussions
This paper has been referenced on Twitter 35 times. VIEW TWEETS

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 17 extracted citations

Traumatic brain injury reduction in athletes by neck strengthening (TRAIN)

Contemporary clinical trials communications • 2018
View 2 Excerpts

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 48 references

Neck strength predicts concussion risk, study says

S. Gregory
TIME Magazine website. http://keepingscore.blogs.time.com/2013/02/21/ study-neck-strength-predicts-concussion-risk/. Published February • 2013

Biomechanics of concussion.

Clinics in sports medicine • 2011
View 1 Excerpt

Does cervical muscle strength in youth ice hockey players affect head impact biomechanics?

Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine • 2011
View 1 Excerpt

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…