Effect of housing system on the calcium requirement of laying hens and on eggshell quality

@article{Lichovnikova2018EffectOH,
  title={Effect of housing system on the calcium requirement of laying hens and on eggshell quality},
  author={Martina Lichovnikova and Ladislav Zeman},
  journal={Czech Journal of Animal Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={53},
  pages={162-168}
}
P < 0.01) in the cage systems (14.2 and 14.0 g/hen/week) than in FS (12.6 g/hen/week). Despite of the same calcium intake of the hens housed in EN and FS the eggshell thickness (0.39 and 0.38 mm, respectively) and eggshell strength (38.04 and 36.43 N respect.) were higher ( P < 0.01 and P < 0.001 respectively) in EN. The tibia breaking strength was higher ( < 0.05) in FS (156.6 N) in comparison with UN (92.7 N). The rate of calcium intake deposited in the eggshells was higher in the cage… 

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