Effect of feed availability on post-milking standing time in dairy cows

@article{Tyler1997EffectOF,
  title={Effect of feed availability on post-milking standing time in dairy cows},
  author={Jeff W. Tyler and L. Fox and Steven M. Parish and John B Swain and D. L. Johnson and H A Grasseschi and R. G. Gant},
  journal={Journal of Dairy Research},
  year={1997},
  volume={64},
  pages={617 - 620}
}
Control programmes for contagious mastitis pathogens, primarily Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus, consisting of milking hygiene, treatment or isolation of infected cows and post-milking teat disinfection are relatively effective (McDonald, 1970; Natzke, 1977; Fox & Gay, 1993). Similar control programmes are often ineffective in the prevention of intramammary infections caused by environmental bacteria (Eberhart, 1977; Smith et al. 1985; Erskine et al. 1991; Smith & Hogan, 1993… 
Modification of postmilking standing time by altering feed availability
Control of environmental mastitis remains a problem on many modern dairy farms. These infections are often transmitted between milkings, and milking hygiene will not prevent new infection.
Relationship between feeding strategy, lying behavior patterns, and incidence of intramammary infection in dairy cows.
TLDR
The results suggest that despite being able to manage post-milking standing times by providing fresh feed at different times around milking, the use of such a feeding strategy in tie stall systems is an unrealistic IMI prevention strategy.
Relationship between postmilking standing duration and risk of intramammary infection in freestall-housed dairy cows milked 3 times per day.
TLDR
Results indicate that management practices that promote PMSD of 90 to 120 min, such as the provision of fresh feed or freshly pushed-up feed around the time of milking, providing ample feed bunk space per cow, and keeping freestall stocking density low, should be encouraged to reduce the risk of CNS IMI inFreestall-housed cows milked 3×/d.
Relationship between the probability of veterinary-diagnosed bovine mastitis occurring and farm management risk factors on small dairy farms in Austria.
TLDR
Several management factors recommended to reduce the probability of mastitis occurring during a cow's lactation period are confirmed, with particular relevance for the small dairy herds common to Austria.
Associations of cow-level factors, frequency of feed delivery, and standing and lying behaviour of dairy cows milked in an automatic system
TLDR
The objectives of this observational study were to quantify the standing and lying behaviour of dairy cows milked in an automatic milking system (AMS) and determine associations of this behaviour with cow-level factors (parity, stage of lactation, production, lameness) and feeding management (frequency of feed delivery).
The feeding behavior of dairy cows: considerations to improve cow welfare and productivity.
One of the primary objectives of dairy producers is to promote dry matter intake (DMI) to support milk production. Considerable research to date has focused on improving the DMI of lactating dairy
Association of standing and lying behavior patterns and incidence of intramammary infection in dairy cows milked with an automatic milking system.
TLDR
Standing and lying behavior patterns of cows milked with an AMS were affected by both feed manipulation and their milking activity, and cows that spend long periods of time standing following milking may be at higher risk of acquiring a new CNS IMI.
Associations of housing, management, milking activity, and standing and lying behavior of dairy cows milked in automatic systems.
TLDR
It can be concluded that increased milking frequency may be achieved in AMS herds by reducing stocking density at the AMS unit and ensuring that cows have ample feed bunk space and have their feed readily available to them in the bunk.
Association Between Standing and Lying Behavior and Udder Health in Free-stall Housed, Lactating Dairy Cows
TLDR
It is suggested that management practices which promote PMSD may help to improve udder health in free-stall cows milked 3x/d.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 13 REFERENCES
Environmental mastitis: cause, prevalence, prevention.
TLDR
Rate of intramammary infection by coliform bacteria and species of streptococci other than Streptococcus agalactiae (environmental pathogens) was studied in a dairy herd in total confinement and increased progressively as parity increased.
Role of teat dips and hygiene in mastitis control.
  • R. P. Natzke
  • Medicine
    Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
  • 1977
TLDR
In herds with clinical coliform mastitis, changing the bedding material has been associated with fewer clinical mastitis cases, and hygienic procedures in herds where teat dipping is practiced did not result in additional beneficial effects.
Influence of milk flow rate and streak canal length on new intramammary infection in dairy cows
TLDR
The results strongly suggest that the benefits of reduced infection from mastitis control, achieved despite dramatic increases in milk flow rate and milk yield, are significantly underestimated.
Relationships among selenium, vitamin E, and mammary gland health in commercial dairy herds.
TLDR
Nine well-managed dairy herds were monitored for 1 yr to determine if bulk tank SCC and rate of clinical mastitis were associated with dietary and plasma Se and vitamin E status, confirming earlier findings that Se anditamin E status of dairy cows are related to mammary gland health.
A review of teat factors in bovine E coli mastitis
TLDR
Escherichia coli mastitis was first reproduced in 1903 by sticking the organism to teat orifices by the introduction of as few as 20 organisms into the teat cistern via the Teat duct.
Effect of vitamin E and selenium supplementation on incidence of clinical mastitis and duration of clinical symptoms.
TLDR
It is concluded that dairy cow diets deficient of vitamin E may elevate incidence of clinical mastitis, and Selenium deficiency may result in greater duration of clinical symptoms, and selenium may interact with vitamin E.
Influence of contractility of papillary sphincter muscle on penetrability of the papillary duct in the bovine quarter after machine milking.
  • A. Lefcourt
  • Medicine
    American journal of veterinary research
  • 1982
TLDR
It would seem that the contractile state of the teat sphincter muscle after milking does not significantly affect penetrability of the papillary duct, at least in terms of a solute, such as endotoxin, however, in a subset of animals, pretreating teats to increase contractile tension actually enhanced penetraterability.
Prevention of intramammary infections by milking time hygiene.
  • J. Mcdonald
  • Medicine
    American journal of veterinary research
  • 1970
...
...