Effect of exposure to natural environment on health inequalities: an observational population study

@article{Mitchell2008EffectOE,
  title={Effect of exposure to natural environment on health inequalities: an observational population study},
  author={Richard Mitchell and Frank Popham},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2008},
  volume={372},
  pages={1655-1660}
}
BACKGROUND Studies have shown that exposure to the natural environment, or so-called green space, has an independent effect on health and health-related behaviours. We postulated that income-related inequality in health would be less pronounced in populations with greater exposure to green space, since access to such areas can modify pathways through which low socioeconomic position can lead to disease. METHODS We classified the population of England at younger than retirement age (n=40 813… Expand
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