Effect of exercise on depression severity in older people: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

@article{Bridle2012EffectOE,
  title={Effect of exercise on depression severity in older people: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials},
  author={Christopher Bridle and Kathleen Spanjers and Shilpa Patel and Nicola M Atherton and Sarah E. Lamb},
  journal={British Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2012},
  volume={201},
  pages={180 - 185}
}
Background The prevelance of depression in older people is high, treatment is inadequate, it creates a substantial burden and is a public health priority for which exercise has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy. Aims To estimate the effect of exercise on depressive symptoms among older people, and assess whether treatment effect varies depending on the depression criteria used to determine participant eligibility. Method Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials… Expand
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