Effect of different host substrates on hemipteran salivary protein profiles *

@article{Habibi2001EffectOD,
  title={Effect of different host substrates on hemipteran salivary protein profiles *},
  author={J. Habibi and E. Backus and T. Coudron and S. L. Brandt},
  journal={Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata},
  year={2001},
  volume={98}
}
Three species of phytophagous insects (Empoasca fabae, E. abrupta and Lygus hesperus) and one species of entomophagous insect (Podisus maculiventris) were transferred from rearing hosts to treatment hosts (THs). After feeding on the THs, the insects were transferred to collection diet sachets (CD) for saliva recovery. The collected salivary proteins were analysed by gel electrophoresis. Different salivary protein profiles were observed for E. fabae and E. abrupta when fed on the same diet… Expand
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