Effect of dietary protein content on ileal amino acid digestibility, growth performance, and formation of microbial metabolites in ileal and cecal digesta of early-weaned pigs.

@article{Htoo2007EffectOD,
  title={Effect of dietary protein content on ileal amino acid digestibility, growth performance, and formation of microbial metabolites in ileal and cecal digesta of early-weaned pigs.},
  author={John Khun Kyaw Htoo and B. A. Araiza and Willem C. Sauer and Meike Rademacher and Y. Zhang and Miguel Cervantes and Ruurd T Zijlstra},
  journal={Journal of animal science},
  year={2007},
  volume={85 12},
  pages={
          3303-12
        }
}
Diarrhea incidence in weaned pigs may be associated with the concentration of intestinal microbial metabolites (ammonia, amines, and VFA) that are influenced by dietary CP content. Three experiments were conducted to determine effects of a low-protein, AA-supplemented diet on ileal AA digestibility, growth performance, diarrhea incidence, and concentration of microbial metabolites in ileal and cecal digesta of pigs weaned at 14 d of age. In Exp. 1, 8 pigs fitted with a simple T-cannula at the… 

Tables from this paper

Apparent or Standardized Ileal Digestibility of Amino Acids of Diets Containing Different Protein Feedstuffs Fed at Two Crude Protein Levels for Growing Pigs

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