Effect of daily aspirin on long-term risk of death due to cancer: analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials

@article{Rothwell2011EffectOD,
  title={Effect of daily aspirin on long-term risk of death due to cancer: analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials},
  author={Peter M. Rothwell and F. Gerald R. Fowkes and Jill J.F. Belch and Hisao Ogawa and Charles P. Warlow and Tom W Meade},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2011},
  volume={377},
  pages={31-41}
}
BACKGROUND Treatment with daily aspirin for 5 years or longer reduces subsequent risk of colorectal cancer. Several lines of evidence suggest that aspirin might also reduce risk of other cancers, particularly of the gastrointestinal tract, but proof in man is lacking. We studied deaths due to cancer during and after randomised trials of daily aspirin versus control done originally for prevention of vascular events. METHODS We used individual patient data from all randomised trials of daily… Expand
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TLDR
Conurrent evaluation of the absolute effects on cancer, CVD and major gastrointestinal bleeding showed that alternate-day use of low-dose aspirin is ineffective or harmful in the majority of women in primary prevention, but selective treatment of women ≥65 years with aspirin may improve net benefit. Expand
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TLDR
Results are consistent with an association between recent daily aspirin use and modestly lower cancer mortality but suggest that any reduction in cancer mortality may be smaller than that observed with long-term aspirin use in the pooled trial analysis. Expand
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