Effect of consumption of food cooked in aluminium or stainless-steel pots on Bangladeshi children with calcium-deficient rickets: an eight month trial.

Abstract

The putative role of aluminium intake in young Bangladeshi children (1.5 to 4 years of age) with calcium-deficient rickets was evaluated in a non randomised controlled eight month trial. The effects of aluminium or stainless-steel cooking pots on bone metabolism were assessed by measuring blood calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D, aminoterminal propeptide of type 1 collagen (PINP), cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (ICTP), aluminium and albumin, and by analysis of wrist radiographs. In both groups, blood alkaline phosphatase, 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D and aluminium decreased significantly, white serum albumin increased (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the nutrition may well be of major importance, whereas the role of aluminium appears to be insignificant.

Cite this paper

@article{Cimma2004EffectOC, title={Effect of consumption of food cooked in aluminium or stainless-steel pots on Bangladeshi children with calcium-deficient rickets: an eight month trial.}, author={Jean-Paul Cimma and Josiane Arnaud and Jos{\'e} Labar{\`e}re and Olivier Guillard and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rique Nugues and Annie Marrauld and Chantal Durand and Jean-Marie Farvacque and Serge Pierre Bottari and Shahidul Haque}, journal={Journal of trace elements in medicine and biology : organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements}, year={2004}, volume={17 4}, pages={249-53} }