Effect of cocaine and related drugs on the uptake of noradrenaline by heart and spleen.

@article{Muscholl1961EffectOC,
  title={Effect of cocaine and related drugs on the uptake of noradrenaline by heart and spleen.},
  author={Erich Muscholl},
  journal={British journal of pharmacology and chemotherapy},
  year={1961},
  volume={16},
  pages={
          352-9
        }
}
  • E. Muscholl
  • Published 1 June 1961
  • Biology, Medicine, Chemistry
  • British journal of pharmacology and chemotherapy
Noradrenaline uptake by heart and spleen after intravenous infusion of noradrenaline was measured in the pithed rat. Cocaine, given before the infusion, inhibited the noradrenaline uptake in relation (a) to the dose administered and (b) to the amount of noradrenaline infused. There was an association between increase in the pressor response to a test dose of noradrenaline and inhibition of the uptake by the heart. Drugs related chemically to cocaine, such as alpha-cocaine, amethocaine, and… 

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