Effect of chlorination of drinking water on experimental salmonella infection in poultry.

Abstract

The type of drinker used for poults influenced the level of free available chlorine (FAC) in chlorinated water as well as the total plate count, fecal coliform count, and number of salmonellae in chlorinated and non-chlorinated drinking water. Nipple drinkers maintained higher levels of FAC in drinking water than Swish-cups, Swish-cups maintained higher levels than MarkIII, and MarkIII maintained higher levels than trough drinkers. The level of FAC retained in the water in trough drinkers was insufficient to exert a bactericidal effect against coliforms and salmonellae. Chlorination of drinking water and the resulting diminished number or absence of salmonellae in the drinking water did not lower the number of salmonellae per gram of cecal contents in challenged or unchallenged but exposed poults. The number of salmonellae per gram of cecal contents decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) in poults between 14 and 21 days of age, irrespective of whether or not the poults drank chlorinated water.

Cite this paper

@article{Poppe1986EffectOC, title={Effect of chlorination of drinking water on experimental salmonella infection in poultry.}, author={Christopher J Poppe and Douglas A. Barnum and William P. R. Mitchell}, journal={Avian diseases}, year={1986}, volume={30 2}, pages={362-9} }