Effect of cannabis on glutamate signalling in the brain: A systematic review of human and animal evidence

@article{Colizzi2016EffectOC,
  title={Effect of cannabis on glutamate signalling in the brain: A systematic review of human and animal evidence},
  author={Marco Colizzi and Philip K. McGuire and Roger G. Pertwee and Sagnik Bhattacharyya},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2016},
  volume={64},
  pages={359-381}
}
Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol increases striatal glutamate levels in healthy individuals: implications for psychosis
TLDR
It is suggested that an increase in striatal glutamate levels may underlie acute cannabis-induced psychosis while lower baseline levels may be a marker of greater sensitivity to its acute psychotomimetic effects and may have important public health implications.
Modulatory effects of cannabinoids on brain neurotransmission
TLDR
The present review has summarized the currently available pre‐clinical and clinical data on the interactions of CB1 and cannabinoid type‐2 receptors (CB2) with the central neurotransmitters; dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline, GABA, glutamate and opioids.
Adolescent‐onset heavy cannabis use associated with significantly reduced glial but not neuronal markers and glutamate levels in the hippocampus
TLDR
Altered myoinositol levels may be a marker of glia dysfunction and is consistent with experimental preclinical evidence that cannabinoid‐induced glial dysfunction may underlie cannabinoid-induced memory impairments in CUs.
Cannabis use in early psychosis is associated with reduced glutamate levels in the prefrontal cortex
TLDR
Cannabis use is associated with reduced prefrontal [GlumPFC] and with a stronger Glu-levels decline with age, which might influence the cognitive impairment observed in users and have some relevance for the progression of the disease.
Does Cannabis Composition Matter? Differential Effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol on Human Cognition
TLDR
This article selectively reviews studies examining the distinctive effects of cannabinoids on human cognition, particularly those of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), and it is unclear whether at specific concentrations CBD might outweigh any harmful effects of Δ9- THC on cognition.
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This is the first systematic review of all studies examining the acute as well as chronic effect of cannabis or its main psychoactive ingredient, THC, on the dopamine system in man, with any reported neurochemical outcomes related to the dopamineSystem after cannabis, cannabinoid or endocannabinoid administration or use.
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CONTEXT The aberrant processing of salience is thought to be a fundamental factor underlying psychosis. Cannabis can induce acute psychotic symptoms, and its chronic use may increase the risk of
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Experimental evidence is provided that impairments in cognitive processes involved in the inhibitory control of thoughts and actions and inferior frontal function under the influence of cannabis may have a role in the emergence of transient psychotic symptoms under its influence.
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