Effect of biologically active plants used as netst material and the derived benefit to starling nestlings

@article{Clark2004EffectOB,
  title={Effect of biologically active plants used as netst material and the derived benefit to starling nestlings},
  author={Larry Clark and J. Russell Mason},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={77},
  pages={174-180}
}
SummaryThe European starling Sturnus vulgaris preferentially incorporates fresh sprigs of particular plant species for use as nesting material. Chemicals found in these plants may act to reduce pathogen and ectoparasite populations normally found in nest environments. The present experiments were performed to test this Nest Protection Hypothesis. In the fild, we experimentally determined that wild carrot Daucus carota, a plant species preferred as nest material, effectively reduced the number… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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