Effect of an activated charcoal product (DOAC Stop™) intended for extracting DOACs on various other APTT-prolonging anticoagulants

@article{Exner2019EffectOA,
  title={Effect of an activated charcoal product (DOAC Stop{\texttrademark}) intended for extracting DOACs on various other APTT-prolonging anticoagulants},
  author={Thomas Exner and Monica Ahuja and Lisa Ellwood},
  journal={Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)},
  year={2019},
  volume={57},
  pages={690 - 696}
}
Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the specificity of an activated charcoal-based product (DOAC Stop™) initially intended for the specific extraction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) from test plasmas on a range of other anticoagulants. Methods Test plasmas were prepared by adding various anticoagulants to pooled normal plasma at concentrations prolonging an activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test by a factor of 1.5–3. These plasmas were treated with DOAC… Expand
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TLDR
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Clotting test results correlate better with DOAC concentrations when expressed as a "Correction Ratio"; results before/after extraction with the DOAC Stop reagent.
TLDR
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Evaluation of the DOAC-Stop Procedure by LC-MS/MS Assays for Determining the Residual Activity of Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, and Apixaban
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  • Clinical and applied thrombosis/hemostasis : official journal of the International Academy of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
  • 2019
TLDR
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Antiphospholipid Syndrome Committee of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology position statement on the use of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)
TLDR
DOACs should not be routinely used in antiphospholipid syndrome patients, especially in those with a high-risk profile (triple positivity to aPL, arterial thrombosis, and recurrentThrombotic events). Expand
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TLDR
The information in this manuscript supplements the previous ICSH DOAC laboratory guidance document and is based on information from peer-reviewed publications about laboratory measurement of DOACs, contributing author's personal experience/expert opinion and good laboratory practice. Expand
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