Effect of altering alarm settings: a randomized controlled study.

@article{Cvach2015EffectOA,
  title={Effect of altering alarm settings: a randomized controlled study.},
  author={Maria M. Cvach and Kathleen J Rothwell and Anne Marie Cullen and Mary Grace Nayden and Nicholas Cvach and Julius Cuong Pham},
  journal={Biomedical instrumentation \& technology},
  year={2015},
  volume={49 3},
  pages={
          214-22
        }
}
UNLABELLED Medical alarm signals are important for alerting clinicians to life-threatening conditions, but the high rate of false alarms can be problematic. Reduction in alarm signals may lead to increased staff responsiveness to alarms and create a quieter environment for patients. The effect of these changes on patient outcomes is uncertain. METHODS We conducted a pilot, prospective, randomized, controlled trial in the cardiac care unit (CCU) to test a study protocol and data collection… 

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