Effect of a dietary protein deficiency on the development of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes in young rats.

Abstract

The effect of protein deprivation on the activities of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes was studied in young rats whose mothers had previously been on a protein-restricted diet during pregnancy. Dietary protein deficiency (5% lactic casein as the protein source) lowered the amount of cytochrome P-450 and the activities of epoxide hydrolase and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT) (l-borneol as the substrate) by about 45, 63, and 48%, for the first 8 weeks, respectively. Interestingly, UDPGT estimated with p-nitrophenol as the substrate was far less affected than that estimated from l-borneol glucuronidation. This finding provides further evidence of the heterogeneity of UDPGT. Restoration of a balanced diet for 15 days following protein deprivation quickly restored cytochrome P-450 and enzyme activities to control values. Our experiments showed that the development of drug-metabolizing enzymes was changed more by the diet in young rats than in older rats. This could affect the toxicity of drugs that are normally metabolized by these pathways.

Cite this paper

@article{Kiffel1982EffectOA, title={Effect of a dietary protein deficiency on the development of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes in young rats.}, author={L Kiffel and Jacques Magdalou and A M Batt and G{\'e}rard Siest and Bernard Beck and J. M. Dollet and G{\'e}rard Debry}, journal={Developmental pharmacology and therapeutics}, year={1982}, volume={4 3-4}, pages={181-9} }