Effect of a Stiff Lifting Belt on Spine Compression During Lifting

@article{Kingma2006EffectOA,
  title={Effect of a Stiff Lifting Belt on Spine Compression During Lifting},
  author={I. Kingma and G. Faber and E. Suwarganda and T. Bruijnen and R. J. Peters and J. V. van Die{\"e}n},
  journal={Spine},
  year={2006},
  volume={31},
  pages={E833-E839}
}
Study Design. An in vivo study on weightlifters. Objectives. To determine if and how a stiff back belt affects spinal compression forces in weightlifting. Summary of Background Data. In weightlifting, a back belt has been reported to enhance intraabdominal pressure (IAP) and to reduce back muscle EMG and spinal compression forces. Methods. Nine experienced weightlifters lifted barbells up to 75% body weight while inhaling and wearing a belt, inhaling and not wearing a belt, and exhaling and… Expand
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