Effect of Pregnancy and Nitric Oxide on the Myogenic Vasodilation of Posterior Cerebral Arteries and the Lower Limit of Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation

@article{Chapman2013EffectOP,
  title={Effect of Pregnancy and Nitric Oxide on the Myogenic Vasodilation of Posterior Cerebral Arteries and the Lower Limit of Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation},
  author={Abbie C. Chapman and Marilyn J. Cipolla and Siu-Lung Chan},
  journal={Reproductive Sciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={20},
  pages={1046 - 1054}
}
Hemorrhage during parturition can lower blood pressure beyond the lower limit of cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation that can cause ischemic brain injury. However, the impact of pregnancy on the lower limit of CBF autoregulation is unknown. We measured myogenic vasodilation, a major contributor of CBF autoregulation, in isolated posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) from nonpregnant and late-pregnant rats (n = 10/group) while the effect of pregnancy on the lower limit of CBF autoregulation… Expand
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