Effect of Olive and Sunflower Seed Oil on the Adult Skin Barrier: Implications for Neonatal Skin Care

@article{Danby2013EffectOO,
  title={Effect of Olive and Sunflower Seed Oil on the Adult Skin Barrier: Implications for Neonatal Skin Care},
  author={Simon G. Danby and tareq alenezi and Amani Sultan and Tina Lavender and John Chittock and Kirsty Brown and Michael J. Cork},
  journal={Pediatric Dermatology},
  year={2013},
  volume={30}
}
Natural oils are advocated and used throughout the world as part of neonatal skin care, but there is an absence of evidence to support this practice. [...] Key Method Nineteen adult volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis were recruited into two randomized forearm-controlled mechanistic studies. The first cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm twice daily for 5 weeks.Expand
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TLDR
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Interactions between the stratum corneum and topically applied products: regulatory, instrumental and formulation issues with focus on moisturizers
  • M. Lodén
  • Medicine
    The British journal of dermatology
  • 2014
TLDR
In the present overview, product presentations and mode of actions are reflected against the regulatory demands in Europe, such as the new cosmetic regulation with advice on testing and responsible marketing.
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