Effect of Endurance Exercise on Autonomic Control of Heart Rate

@article{Carter2003EffectOE,
  title={Effect of Endurance Exercise on Autonomic Control of Heart Rate},
  author={James B Carter and Eric W. Banister and Andrew P. Blaber},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={33},
  pages={33-46}
}
Long-term endurance training significantly influences how the autonomic nervous system controls heart function. Endurance training increases parasympathetic activity and decreases sympathetic activity in the human heart at rest. These two training-induced autonomic effects, coupled with a possible reduction in intrinsic heart rate, decrease resting heart rate. Long-term endurance training also decreases submaximal exercise heart rate by reducing sympathetic activity to the heart. Physiological… 
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