• Corpus ID: 90040664

Effect of Acoustic Signaling, Metabolic Rate, and Size on Territoriality in Male Cyphoderris monstrosa (Orthoptera: Haglidae)

@inproceedings{Chang2015EffectOA,
  title={Effect of Acoustic Signaling, Metabolic Rate, and Size on Territoriality in Male Cyphoderris monstrosa (Orthoptera: Haglidae)},
  author={Te-tzu Chang},
  year={2015}
}
  • T. Chang
  • Published 1 November 2015
  • Biology
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Table of 

References

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TLDR
The results demonstrate that the proportion of time spent singing is a true indication of a male's aggressive ability, and that males use this information during territorial interactions.
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Parallelisms and convergences are observed in the evolution of acoustic communication systems, but complex analysis allows revealing the initial type of the acoustic system and defining the reasons for adaptive reorganizations.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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