Effect and Process Evaluation of a Smartphone App to Promote an Active Lifestyle in Lower Educated Working Young Adults: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

@article{Simons2018EffectAP,
  title={Effect and Process Evaluation of a Smartphone App to Promote an Active Lifestyle in Lower Educated Working Young Adults: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial},
  author={Dorien Simons and Ilse de Bourdeaudhuij and Peter Clarys and Katrien De Cocker and Corneel Vandelanotte and Benedicte Deforche},
  journal={JMIR mHealth and uHealth},
  year={2018},
  volume={6}
}
Background Mobile technologies have great potential to promote an active lifestyle in lower educated working young adults, an underresearched target group at a high risk of low activity levels. Objective The objective of our study was to examine the effect and process evaluation of the newly developed evidence- and theory-based smartphone app “Active Coach” on the objectively measured total daily physical activity; self-reported, context-specific physical activity; and self-reported… 

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