Edward III and the Beginnings of the Hundred Years War

@article{Templeman1952EdwardIA,
  title={Edward III and the Beginnings of the Hundred Years War},
  author={Geoffrey Templeman},
  journal={Transactions of the Royal Historical Society},
  year={1952},
  volume={2},
  pages={69 - 88}
}
  • G. Templeman
  • Published 1 January 1952
  • History
  • Transactions of the Royal Historical Society
Historians have long been concerned with the circumstances in which the Hundred Years War began, and their interest shows no sign of slackening. During the present century not a little has been added to our knowledge of the matter through the labours of scholars in this country, in the United States and on the continent. This means that by now a formidable array of evidence bearing on the subject has been brought to light, while numerous books and articles, packed with comment and explanation… 
4 Citations

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Entre les dernières années du XIIIe siècle et le milieu du XVe, le Pordelais représente un enjeu de marque dans l'interminable conflit qui oppose les Plantagenets puis les Lancastres aux Valois.