Education and risk factors for coronary heart disease: results from a New England community.

Abstract

This article investigates the association of education with the estimated coronary heart disease (CHD) risk and the prevalence of CHD risk factors for men and women in a New England community over a period of 10 years. Educational differentials in knowledge of cardiovascular disease prevention, body mass index (BMI), total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, cigarette smoking, and hypertension were examined for 3,765 respondents 25-64 years of age from five surveys of the Pawtucket Heart Health Program. We found a clear negative association between education and composite CHD risk. A stable separation in risk level was maintained across time between the least educated (< 12 years of education) and the other two educational groups (12, > or = 13 years of education) in both men and women. Educational differentials were observed in BMI and total and HDL cholesterol of the women 25-44 years of age. For men and women 25-44 years of age, smoking was negatively associated with education. Hypertension differed by education level among the women 45-64 years of age. These findings are highly comparable with the national data from aggregate vital statistics and the results of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cohort follow-up.

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@article{Reynes1993EducationAR, title={Education and risk factors for coronary heart disease: results from a New England community.}, author={Josephina Reynes and Thomas M. Lasater and Henry A. Feldman and Annlouise R. Assaf and Richard A. Carleton}, journal={American journal of preventive medicine}, year={1993}, volume={9 6}, pages={365-71} }