Education Expenditure Responses to Crop Loss in Indonesia: A Gender Bias

@article{Cameron2001EducationER,
  title={Education Expenditure Responses to Crop Loss in Indonesia: A Gender Bias},
  author={L. Cameron and C. Worswick},
  journal={Economic Development and Cultural Change},
  year={2001},
  volume={49},
  pages={351 - 363}
}
  • L. Cameron, C. Worswick
  • Published 2001
  • Economics
  • Economic Development and Cultural Change
  • This paper studies the impact of crop loss on the level of educational expenditure of Indonesian households using data from the 1993 Indonesian Family Life Survey. The data are unique in that they contain self-reported information on crop loss and on household responses to crop loss. Thirty-four percent of households that experience a crop loss report that they responded by cutting household expenditure. 
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