Editorial: Treating depression in the developing world

@article{Patel2004EditorialTD,
  title={Editorial: Treating depression in the developing world},
  author={Vikram Patel and Ricardo Araya and Paul A Bolton},
  journal={Tropical Medicine \& International Health},
  year={2004},
  volume={9}
}
Despite the contention by the WHO (2001a) that depression is a major cause of disability in the world, this illness receives little programmatic and research attention in developing countries. There are several reasons for this. First, it is believed in many circles that depression is a ‘Western’ diagnostic entity with limited public health relevance in other cultures. This belief persists despite evidence of numerous studies across the developing world which have shown that depression is… 
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