Editorial: 100 years of epidemic meningitis in West Africa – has anything changed?

@article{Greenwood2006Editorial1Y,
  title={Editorial: 100 years of epidemic meningitis in West Africa – has anything changed?},
  author={Brian Greenwood},
  journal={Tropical Medicine \& International Health},
  year={2006},
  volume={11}
}
  • B. Greenwood
  • Published 1 June 2006
  • Medicine
  • Tropical Medicine & International Health
Invasive meningococcal infection is probably a relatively new disease. The first recorded outbreak occurred in Geneva in 1805 (Vieusseux 1806). The following year, typical cases of meningococcal meningitis (cerebro-spinal meningitis) were seen in New England (Danielson &Mann 1806) and epidemics occurred across Europe and North America throughout the nineteenth century. In 1840, the first outbreak in Africa was reported among French troops based in Algiers (Chalmers & O’Farrell 1916) and during… 
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