Edible insects: Traditional knowledge or western phobia?

@article{Yen2009EdibleIT,
  title={Edible insects: Traditional knowledge or western phobia?},
  author={A. Yen},
  journal={Entomological Research},
  year={2009},
  volume={39}
}
  • A. Yen
  • Published 2009
  • Biology
  • Entomological Research
With an increasing human population and environmental degradation, the world faces a major problem in providing adequate animal based proteins. Many traditional societies have used or still use insects as a protein source, while westernized societies are reluctant to use insects, despite being the major consumers of animal proteins. We now need to consider insects as a source of food for humans in a manner that acknowledges both the role of entomophagy in indigenous societies and the need for… Expand
Understanding Edible Insects as Food in Western and Eastern Societies
In the forthcoming decades, insects might become an important alternative protein source for human consumption. However, what do consumers think about eating insects? The answer is still not veryExpand
Insects as Food: History, Culture, and Modern Use around the World
TLDR
This chapter presents an updated information on 1571 species of insects and spiders used as food worldwide and the value of traditional entomological knowledge regarding indigenous and local traditions and uses of insects. Expand
Insects as food and feed in the Asia Pacific region: current perspectives and future directions
Western cultures currently struggle to have insects accepted as a human food. This barrier is not as high in many parts of the Asia Pacific region because entomophagy is (or was until recent times) aExpand
Exploring the Acceptance of Entomophagy: A Survey of Italian Consumers
TLDR
A specific experimental scale of insects was introduced which, together with a neophobia scale, analyzed the probability and the intention of respondents to consume insects and confirmed the need for a specific scale to measure “insect phobia”. Expand
Edible Insects: A Neglected and Promising Food Source
TLDR
In the Western world, consumer acceptability will relate to pricing, perceived environmental benefits, and the development of tasty insect-derived protein products, such as cricket bars, which can be addressed by labeling. Expand
Edible insects acceptance by belgian consumers: promising attitude for entomophagy development
TLDR
The results show that consumers are ready to buy and cook insects at home if they are able to associate them with familiar flavors, and the edible insects' potential to become a usual food ingredient in Western European populations is shown. Expand
Some key elements on entomophagy in Africa: culture, gender and belief
Edible insects are a natural renewable food resource and, within the context of food security could be one solution for Africa. Although, entomophagy is still being practiced in Africa, there is aExpand
Nutritional Properties of Edible Insects
TLDR
Insects are the biggest animal group on earth and can be regarded as safe, if properly managed and consumed, but international food regulations are needed. Expand
Sensory and Consumer Perspectives on Edible Insects
TLDR
It is still necessary to improve the sensory properties of the insect-based foods to drive Western consumers into the adoption of edible insects in their regular diets. Expand
Entomophagy and human food security
TLDR
Food security is a problem in many developing and less developed countries due to increase in human population and decrease in crop productivity and food availability, and entomophagy offers an opportunity to bridge the protein gap of human foods irrespective of a few constraints that are discussed. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 118 REFERENCES
The Human Use of Insects as Food and as Animal Feed
Edible insects are afood resource tbat continues to be tapped extensiuely by populations in tbe rural Third World, wbile continuing to be ignored by food and agricultural scientists. Tbe unfoundedExpand
An overview of the role of edible insects in preserving biodiversity
In this discussion the principle is adopted that factors tending to increase food and/or income for economically marginal rural families, while decreasing pressure for land‐clearing, pesticides andExpand
Insects as human food: Gene DeFoliart discusses some nutritional and economic aspects
TLDR
Edible insects may be closer now than ever before to acceptance in the western world as a resource that should be considered in trying to meet the world's present and future food needs. Expand
Edible insects as minilivestock
Many species of insects (probably 1000 or more) have served as traditional foods among indigenous peoples, especially in warmer climes, and the insects have played an important role in the history ofExpand
Minilivestock: from gathering to controlled production
TLDR
The development of minilivestock will contribute to meeting human needs and will also protect the environment from excessive harvesting. Expand
Contribution of forest insects to food security and forest conservation : The example of caterpillars in Central Africa
W ild lif e Po lic y N um be r 3, J an ua ry 2 00 4 Policy Conclusions ! In areas such as the Congo Basin, insects contribute significantly to the food security and livelihoods of the poor, asExpand
The Geography of Edible Insects in Sub-Saharan Africa: a study of the Mopane Caterpillar
Entomophagy, the human consumption of insects, has not received significant attention in Western literature, despite the critical role which it plays as a protein supplement in many parts of theExpand
Edible insects and other invertebrates in Australia: future prospects.
TLDR
Over the last 200 years, entomophagy among Australian Aborigines has decreased because of the increasing adoption of European diets, changed social structures and changes in demography. Expand
Current status and perspective of the insect industry in Korea
TLDR
The total market size of the insect industry in Korea is estimated around $110 million, and is expected to increase up to $320 million by 2015, when insects can be applied to foods, dietary supplements and medicines, and hygiene enabling disposal of food and animal wastes. Expand
Traditional knowledge and rationale for weaver ant husbandry in the Mekong delta of Vietnam
The weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), has long been known as perhaps the first example of human manipulation of a natural predator population to enhance theExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...