Edge geometry influences patch-level habitat use by an edge specialist in south-eastern Australia

@article{Taylor2008EdgeGI,
  title={Edge geometry influences patch-level habitat use by an edge specialist in south-eastern Australia},
  author={Rick S. Taylor and Joanne M. Oldland and Michael F. Clarke},
  journal={Landscape Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={23},
  pages={377-389}
}
We investigated patterns in habitat use by the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala) along farmland-woodland edges of large patches of remnant vegetation (>300 ha) in the highly fragmented box-ironbark woodlands and forests of central Victoria, Australia. Noisy miners exclude small birds from their territories, and are considered a significant threat to woodland bird communities in the study region. Seventeen different characteristics of edge habitat were recorded, together with the detection or… 

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