Ectopic calcification and bone: a comparison of the effect of dietary carbohydrates, sugars and protein

Abstract

Cardiovascular (CV) calcification presence, extent and progression has been shown in several studies to correlate with fracture or low bone mineral density (BMD), particularly in older men and women1-3. CV calcification shares some similar properties with cortical bone4 and, when severe, can manifest as bone formation in both arteries and valves5,6. CV calcification and impaired bone metabolism are particularly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD), where the condition has become known as mineral-bone disorder (MBD)7. The association between bone and ectopic calcification is further strengthened by studies showing that renal calcification can be prevented by ibandronate, which inhibits bone resorption8. Although calcification can be associated with atherosclerosis (i.e. intimal calcification), the deposition of hydroxyapatite is primarily medial; its pathophysiology is complex, involving not only physicochemical factors but also biological actions in smooth muscle9. Although a number of studies have been carried out on the influence of dietary carbohydrates, sugars and protein on bone, those relating diet to ectopic calcification are considerably fewer and the comparison is necessarily restricted.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Nicoll2014EctopicCA, title={Ectopic calcification and bone: a comparison of the effect of dietary carbohydrates, sugars and protein}, author={Rachel Nicoll and B Ma and John Mclaren and Michael y . Henein}, year={2014} }