Ecosystem Collapse in Pleistocene Australia and a Human Role in Megafaunal Extinction

@article{Miller2005EcosystemCI,
  title={Ecosystem Collapse in Pleistocene Australia and a Human Role in Megafaunal Extinction},
  author={G. Miller and M. Fogel and J. Magee and M. Gagan and S. Clarke and B. Johnson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={309},
  pages={287 - 290}
}
  • G. Miller, M. Fogel, +3 authors B. Johnson
  • Published 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • Most of Australia's largest mammals became extinct 50,000 to 45,000 years ago, shortly after humans colonized the continent. Without exceptional climate change at that time, a human cause is inferred, but a mechanism remains elusive. A 140,000-year record of dietary δ13C documents a permanent reduction in food sources available to the Australian emu, beginning about the time of human colonization; a change replicated at three widely separated sites and in the marsupial wombat. We speculate that… CONTINUE READING
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