Economics of Air Pollution and Health in Developing Countries A Brief Literature Survey

Abstract

They compare cost-of-illness (COI) and willingness-to-pay (WTP) estimates of the damages from minor respiratory symptoms associated with air pollution using data from a study in Taiwan in 1991-92. A contingent valuation survey is conducted to estimate WTP to avoid minor respiratory illnesses. Health diaries are analyzed to predict the likelihood and cost of seeking relief from symptoms and of missing work. As predicted by estimates, exceeding the latter by 1.61 to 2.26 times, depending on pollution levels. These ratios are similar to those for the United States, despite the differences between the two countries. 2. Alberini, A., M. L. Cropper, T. T. Fu, A. Krupnick, J. T. Liu, D. Shaw and W. Harrington (1997), ‘Valuing Health Effects of Air Pollution in Developing Countries: The Case of Taiwan’, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 34 (2): 107-126. (Only Abstract Available) Abstract: A contingent valuation survey was conducted in Taiwan to elicit willingness to pay (WTP) to avoid a recurrence of the episode of acute respiratory illness most recently experienced by the respondent. We estimate a model in which willingness to pay depends on the attributes of the illness (duration and number of symptoms, and nature of the illness) and on respondent characteristics (such as income and health history), and allow mitigating behavior to be endogenously determined with willingness to pay. WTP of Taiwanese households is compared with benefits transfer extrapolations that adjust WTP for the United States by Taiwan household income, relative to U.S. household income. (c) 1997 Academic Press A contingent valuation survey was conducted in Taiwan to elicit willingness to pay (WTP) to avoid a recurrence of the episode of acute respiratory illness most recently experienced by the respondent. We estimate a model in which willingness to pay depends on the attributes of the illness (duration and number of symptoms, and nature of the illness) and on respondent characteristics (such as income and health history), and allow mitigating behavior to be endogenously determined with willingness to pay. WTP of Taiwanese households is compared with benefits transfer extrapolations that adjust WTP for the United States by Taiwan household income, relative to U.S. household income. (c) 1997 Academic Press 3. Alberini, A. and A. Krupnick (1998), ‘Air Quality and Episodes of Acute Respiratory Illness in Taiwan Cities: Evidence from Survey Data,’ Journal of Urban Economics 44(1): 68-92. (Only Abstract Available) Abstract: This paper reports on a unique study that records daily health status for over nine hundred residents of three urban areas in Taiwan and elicits their willingness to pay to avoid episodes of illness. Incidence of illness is related to the ambient concentration levels of particulate matter but the effects are much less pronounced than would be expected from earlier U.S. studies. Willingness to pay to avoid illness is considerably higher than that predicted by extrapolations of U.S. studies that rely on simple income adjustments. The authors argue that extrapolations from U.S. studies may be inadequate for predicting the benefits of reduced pollution levels in developing countries. (c) 1998 Academic Press This paper reports on a unique study that records daily health status for over nine hundred residents of three urban areas in Taiwan and elicits their willingness to pay to avoid episodes of illness. Incidence of illness is related to the ambient concentration levels of particulate matter but the effects are much less pronounced than would be expected from earlier U.S. studies. Willingness to pay to avoid illness is considerably higher than that predicted by extrapolations of U.S. studies that rely on simple income adjustments. The authors argue that extrapolations from U.S. studies may be inadequate for predicting the benefits of reduced pollution levels in developing countries. (c) 1998 Academic Press 4. Aunan, K et al., (1998), ‘Health and Environmental Benefits from Air Pollution Reductions in Hungary,’ The Science of the Total Environment 212: 245-268. Abstract: The aim of this study is to assess the cost and benefit of the implementation of a specific energy saving program in Hungary. They consider the possible reduced damage to public health, building materials and agricultural crops that may be obtained from reducing emissions of important air pollutants and also how the program contributes to reduced emissions of greenhouse gases. The measures are described in the National Energy Efficiency Improvement and Energy Conservation Programs (NEEIECP), elaborated by the Hungarian Ministry of Industry and Trade and accepted by the Government in 1994. The energy saving expected from the program is approximately 64 PJ/year. The benefits were estimated using monitoring data and population/ recipient data from urban and The aim of this study is to assess the cost and benefit of the implementation of a specific energy saving program in Hungary. They consider the possible reduced damage to public health, building materials and agricultural crops that may be obtained from reducing emissions of important air pollutants and also how the program contributes to reduced emissions of greenhouse gases. The measures are described in the National Energy Efficiency Improvement and Energy Conservation Programs (NEEIECP), elaborated by the Hungarian Ministry of Industry and Trade and accepted by the Government in 1994. The energy saving expected from the program is approximately 64 PJ/year. The benefits were estimated using monitoring data and population/ recipient data from urban and

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@inproceedings{Hegde2001EconomicsOA, title={Economics of Air Pollution and Health in Developing Countries A Brief Literature Survey}, author={Shayana A Hegde and Anuradha Kafle}, year={2001} }