Economic outcomes of inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment for complicated skin and soft tissue infections: a multicenter prospective observational study.

Abstract

This study examined economic outcomes associated with inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment (IIAT) in complicated skin and soft tissue infections using data from adults hospitalized and treated with intravenous antibiotic therapy. We specifically analyzed for the subsets of patients infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with healthcare-associated (HCA) infections, or both. Data from 494 patients (HCA: 360; MRSA:175; MRSA + HCA: 129) showed the overall mean length of stay (LOS) was 7.4 days and 15.0% had the composite economic outcome of any subsequent hospital admissions, emergency department visits, or unscheduled visits related to the study infection. A total of 23.1% of patients had IIAT; after adjustments, these patients had longer LOS than patients without IIAT in the HCA cohort (marginal LOS = 1.39 days, P = 0.03) and the MRSA + HCA cohort (marginal LOS = 2.43 days, P = 0.01) and were significantly more likely to have the composite economic outcome in all study cohorts (odds ratio: overall = 1.79; HCA = 3.09; MRSA = 3.66; MRSA + HCA = 6.92; all P < 0.05).

DOI: 10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2014.02.013

Cite this paper

@article{Lipsky2014EconomicOO, title={Economic outcomes of inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment for complicated skin and soft tissue infections: a multicenter prospective observational study.}, author={Benjamin A. Lipsky and Lena M. Napolitano and Gregory J. Moran and Lien Vo and Stacy H Nicholson and S Chen and Luke Boulanger and T K Kim}, journal={Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease}, year={2014}, volume={79 2}, pages={266-72} }