Economic evaluation strategies in telehealth: Obtaining a more holistic valuation of telehealth interventions

@article{Snoswell2017EconomicES,
  title={Economic evaluation strategies in telehealth: Obtaining a more holistic valuation of telehealth interventions},
  author={Centaine L. Snoswell and Anthony C. Smith and Paul A. Scuffham and Jennifer A. Whitty},
  journal={Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare},
  year={2017},
  volume={23},
  pages={792 - 796}
}
Telehealth is an emerging area of medical research. Its translation from conception, to research and into practice requires tailored research and economic evaluation methods. Due to their nature telehealth interventions exhibit a number of extra-clinical benefits that are relevant when valuing their costs and outcomes. By incorporating methods to measure societal values such as patient preference and willingness-to-pay, a more holistic value can be placed on the extra-clinical outcomes… Expand
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