Economic cost of autism in the UK

@article{Knapp2009EconomicCO,
  title={Economic cost of autism in the UK},
  author={Martin Knapp and Renee Romeo and Jennifer K Beecham},
  journal={Autism},
  year={2009},
  volume={13},
  pages={317 - 336}
}
Autism has lifetime consequences, with potentially a range of impacts on the health, wellbeing, social integration and quality of life of individuals and families. Many of those impacts are economic. This study estimated the costs of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the UK. Data on prevalence, level of intellectual disability and place of residence were combined with average annual costs of services and support, together with the opportunity costs of lost productivity. The costs of… Expand

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