Economic Inequality, Legitimacy, and Cross-National Homicide Rates

@article{Chamlin2006EconomicIL,
  title={Economic Inequality, Legitimacy, and Cross-National Homicide Rates},
  author={Mitchell B. Chamlin and John K. Cochran},
  journal={Homicide Studies},
  year={2006},
  volume={10},
  pages={231 - 252}
}
This research is concerned with explicating and modeling the causal linkages from economic inequality to homicide among nation-states. Specifically, the authors posit that the effect of economic inequality on cross-national homicide rates is mediated by the perceived legitimacy of the system of stratification; that is, the effect of economic inequality on cross-national homicide rates should be substantially attenuated once perceived legitimacy is controlled. The authors test this hypothesis… 

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