Ecomorphology of the giant short-faced bears Agriotherium and Arctodus

@article{Sorkin2006EcomorphologyOT,
  title={Ecomorphology of the giant short-faced bears Agriotherium and Arctodus},
  author={Boris Sorkin},
  journal={Historical Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={18},
  pages={1 - 20}
}
  • B. Sorkin
  • Published 1 January 2006
  • Biology
  • Historical Biology
The hypothesis that giant short-faced bears of the genera Agriotherium and Arctodus were primarily carnivorous and preyed on large terrestrial mammals is examined. It is argued that the shape and wear pattern of the cheek teeth and the presence of the premasseteric fossa on the mandible in these two ursids suggest a large amount of plant material in their diet. Likewise, the absence of adaptations for either ambush or pursuit predation in their skull and postcranial skeleton suggest that they… Expand
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