Ecology rather than psychology explains co-occurrence of predation and border patrols in male chimpanzees

@article{Gilby2013EcologyRT,
  title={Ecology rather than psychology explains co-occurrence of predation and border patrols in male chimpanzees},
  author={Ian C. Gilby and Michael Lawrence Wilson and Anne E Pusey},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2013},
  volume={86},
  pages={61-74}
}
The intense arousal and excitement shown by adult male chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, during territorial attacks on other chimpanzees and predation upon monkeys suggest that similar psychological mechanisms may be involved. Specifically, it has been proposed that hunting behaviour in chimpanzees evolved from intraspecies aggression. Over 32 years, chimpanzees at Gombe National Park, Tanzania were significantly more likely to engage in a territorial border patrol on days when they hunted red… CONTINUE READING
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