Ecology of gorillas and its relation to female transfer in mountain gorillas

@article{Watts2005EcologyOG,
  title={Ecology of gorillas and its relation to female transfer in mountain gorillas},
  author={David P. Watts},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2005},
  volume={11},
  pages={21-45}
}
  • D. Watts
  • Published 2005
  • Biology
  • International Journal of Primatology
Understanding the principles that underly primate social evolution depends on integrated analysis of data on behavioral ecology, demography, life history tactics, and social organization. In this paper, data on the behavioral ecology of gorillas are reviewed and comparisons made among the three subspecies. Gorillas are selective feeders; and, their patterns of food choice are consistent with models of feeding by large generalist herbivores. They rely heavily on terrestrial herbaceous vegetation… Expand

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