Ecology of black beetle, Heteronychus arator (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) - population modelling.

@article{King1981EcologyOB,
  title={Ecology of black beetle, Heteronychus arator (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) - population modelling.},
  author={P. D. King and C. Mercer and J. Meekings},
  journal={New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research},
  year={1981},
  volume={24},
  pages={99-105}
}
Abstract A preliminary model was constructed of the population dynamics of black beetle, Heteronychus arator (F.), in Paspalum dilatatum pasture. Mortality could be modelled as a simple function of seasonal temperatures. The model was based on the relationships between spring temperature and summer mortality and the density-dependent variation in natality which reflects changes in adult immigration and/or fecundity with changes in density. The model was used to simulate populations over a 25… Expand
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During a survey for pathogens of black beetle, high mortality was observed in a population in kikuyu pasture at Wharepapa, near Helensville, and several pathogens were isolated, including a protozoan, a rickettsia, a fungus, and a neoaplectanid nematode and a small RNA virus. Expand
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The influence of pasture plant species on the aggregation and oviposition behaviour of black beetle adults was examined, and a preference for grasses, and in particular for Paspolum dilatatum, as Oviposition sites was noted. Expand
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