Ecology of Leptocoris Hahn (Hemiptera: Rhopalidae) soapberry bugs in Australia

@article{Carroll2005EcologyOL,
  title={Ecology of Leptocoris Hahn (Hemiptera: Rhopalidae) soapberry bugs in Australia},
  author={Scott P Carroll and Jenella E. Loye and Hugh Dingle and Michael T. Mathieson and Myron P. Zalucki},
  journal={Australian Journal of Entomology},
  year={2005},
  volume={44},
  pages={344-353}
}
Soapberry bugs are worldwide seed predators of plants in the family Sapindaceae. Australian sapinds are diverse and widespread, consisting of about 200 native trees and shrubs. This flora also includes two introduced environmental weeds, plus cultivated lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.), longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) and rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.). Accordingly, Australian soapberry bugs may be significant in ecology, conservation and agriculture. Here we provide the first account of… 

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