Ecology and evolution of pine life histories

@article{Keeley2012EcologyAE,
  title={Ecology and evolution of pine life histories},
  author={J. Keeley},
  journal={Annals of Forest Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={69},
  pages={445-453}
}
  • J. Keeley
  • Published 2012
  • Biology
  • Annals of Forest Science
  • IntroductionPinus is a diverse genus of trees widely distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Understanding pine life history is critical to both conservation and fire management.ObjectivesHere I lay out the different pathways of pine life history adaptation and a brief overview of pine evolution and the very significant role that fire has played.ResultsPinus originated ~150 Ma in the mid-Mesozoic Era and radiated across the northern continent of Laurasia during the Cretaceous Period… CONTINUE READING

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