Ecology and diversity of waxcap (Hygrocybe spp.) Fungi

@article{Griffith2002EcologyAD,
  title={Ecology and diversity of waxcap (Hygrocybe spp.) Fungi},
  author={Gareth W. Griffith and Gary L. Easton and Andrew W. Jones},
  journal={Botanical Journal of Scotland},
  year={2002},
  volume={54},
  pages={22 - 7}
}
Summary Members of the genus Hygrocybe are ubiquitous and colourful components of many undisturbed and nutrient-poor grasslands in the UK. Through a number of detailed surveys of the distribution of Hygrocybe spp. and of genera showing similar patterns of occurrence (e.g. Clavaria spp., Entoloma spp., Geoglossum spp.) a picture is gradually emerging of the more important ‘waxcap grassland’ sites, and of those species in greatest need of protection. Waxcap fungi are far from ideal experimental… Expand
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