Ecology and Evolution of Insect-Fungus Mutualisms.

@article{Biedermann2019EcologyAE,
  title={Ecology and Evolution of Insect-Fungus Mutualisms.},
  author={Peter H. W. Biedermann and Fernando E. Vega},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2019}
}
The evolution of a mutualism requires reciprocal interactions whereby one species provides a service that the other species cannot perform or performs less efficiently. Services exchanged in insect-fungus mutualisms include nutrition, protection, and dispersal. In ectosymbioses, which are the focus of this review, fungi can be consumed by insects or can degrade plant polymers or defensive compounds, thereby making a substrate available to insects. They can also protect against environmental… 

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