Ecological studies of wild rodent plague in the San Francisco Bay area of California. VI. The relative abundance of certain flea species and their host relationships on coexisting wild and domestic rodents.

@article{Stark1962EcologicalSO,
  title={Ecological studies of wild rodent plague in the San Francisco Bay area of California. VI. The relative abundance of certain flea species and their host relationships on coexisting wild and domestic rodents.},
  author={H. Stark and V. I. Miles},
  journal={The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene},
  year={1962},
  volume={11},
  pages={
          525-34
        }
}
  • H. Stark, V. I. Miles
  • Published 1962
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene

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