Ecological factors influence population genetic structure of European grey wolves

@article{Pilot2006EcologicalFI,
  title={Ecological factors influence population genetic structure of European grey wolves},
  author={Małgorzata Pilot and Włodzimierz Jędrzejewski and Wojciech Branicki and Vadim E. Sidorovich and Bogumiła Jędrzejewska and Krystyna Stachura and Stephan Michael Funk},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2006},
  volume={15}
}
Although the mechanisms controlling gene flow among populations are particularly important for evolutionary processes, they are still poorly understood, especially in the case of large carnivoran mammals with extensive continuous distributions. We studied the question of factors affecting population genetic structure in the grey wolf, Canis lupus, one of the most mobile terrestrial carnivores. We analysed variability in mitochondrial DNA and 14 microsatellite loci for a sample of 643… 
Ecological factors drive differentiation in wolves from British Columbia
TLDR
It is proposed that dispersing grey wolves select habitats similar to the one in which they were reared, and that this differentiation is maintained largely through behavioural mechanisms, suggesting that ecological factors are driving wolf differentiation in British Columbia.
Ecology, environment and evolutionary history influence genetic structure in five mammal species from the Italian Alps
TLDR
It is concluded that heterogeneous landscape has some influence on within-population diversity, but biogeographical history has probably had the stronger influence on current genetic patterns, despite an apparently large dispersal potential of certain species.
Genetic structure in large, continuous mammal populations: the example of brown bears in northwestern Eurasia
TLDR
Data on population structure, genetic diversity and gene flow in a brown bear population inhabiting the large territory of northwestern Eurasia indicates a complex pattern where a fraction of the population exhibits large‐scale gene flow that is unparalleled by other wild mammals studied to date.
Females Shape the Genetic Structure of a Gorilla Population
TLDR
The results suggest that individual dietary preferences are important even in a highly mobile species living amid abundant food, and it is proposed that preference for natal habitats will influence dispersal decisions in many other vertebrate taxa.
Dietary Differentiation and the Evolution of Population Genetic Structure in a Highly Mobile Carnivore
TLDR
Stable isotope profiles for Eastern European wolves were analyzed as a quantifiable proxy measure of diet for individuals that had been genotyped in an earlier study to provide a quantitative assessment of the relationship between individual foraging behavior and genotype.
Long-Range Gene Flow and the Effects of Climatic and Ecological Factors on Genetic Structuring in a Large, Solitary Carnivore: The Eurasian Lynx
TLDR
Eurasian lynx are capable of maintaining panmictic populations across eastern Europe unless they are severely limited by habitat continuity or a reduction in numbers, and different correlations of mtDNA and microsatellite population divergence patterns with climatic and ecological factors may suggest separate selective pressures acting on males and females in this solitary carnivore.
Combining Bayesian genetic clustering and ecological niche modeling: Insights into wolf intraspecific genetic structure
TLDR
Both the plasticity of wolves—a habitat generalist—to cope with different environmental conditions and the occurrence of barriers that limit gene flow lead to the formation of genetic intraspecific genetic clusters and their distinct ecological niches.
Dynamic range expansion leads to establishment of a new, genetically distinct wolf population in Central Europe
TLDR
It is concluded that the process of dynamic recolonization of Central European lowlands lead to the formation of a new, genetically distinct wolf population in Western Poland, suggesting that demographic dynamics and possibly anthropogenic barriers rather than ecological factors shape the current wolf genetic structure in Central Europe.
Low but contrasting neutral genetic differentiation shaped by winter temperature in European great tits
TLDR
The results suggest that great tits form a single patchy metapopulation across Europe, in which genetic differentiation is independent of geographical distance and gene flow may be regulated by environmental factors via movements related to winter severity.
Gene flow and population structure of a solitary top carnivore in a human-dominated landscape
TLDR
The results indicate that the leopard population in the study region may become isolated within a few generations and suggest that management actions should aim to increase habitat connectivity and reduce human–carnivore conflict.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 144 REFERENCES
Climate and habitat barriers to dispersal in the highly mobile grey wolf
TLDR
It is found that, contrary to a previous report, a pattern of isolation with distance is evident on a continental scale in the North American wolf population and vegetation types appear to play a role in the genetic dissimilarities among populations.
Prey specialization may influence patterns of gene flow in wolves of the Canadian Northwest
TLDR
Results indicate that wolf gene flow is reduced significantly across the Mackenzie River, most likely due to the north–south migration patterns of the barren‐ground caribou herds that flank it, and the possibility that these barriers reflect prey specialization by wolves in different regions.
Genetic structure is influenced by landscape features: empirical evidence from a roe deer population
TLDR
The analysis suggests that the landscape has a significant influence on the structuring of the population under study, and illustrates the use of geneland as a powerful method to infer population structure, even in situations of young populations exhibiting low genetic differentiation.
Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography and population history of the grey wolf Canis lupus
TLDR
The results suggest that fluctuating population sizes during the late Pleistocene have left a genetic signature on levels of variation in both species, and a statistical parsimony analysis indicates local genetic structure that suggests recent restricted gene flow.
Mitochondrial DNA Variability of the Gray Wolf: Genetic Consequences of Population Decline and Habitat Fragmentation
TLDR
It is suggested that the difference between these two species reflects the rapid, recent increase in coyote numbers and expansion of their geographic range, and the coincident decline in gray wolf populations.
Evidence of genetic distinction and long‐term population decline in wolves (Canis lupus) in the Italian Apennines
TLDR
Results of a Bayesian coalescent model indicate that wolves in Italy underwent a 100‐ to 1000‐fold population contraction over the past 2000–10 000 years, suggesting that wolves have apparently been genetically isolated for thousands of generations south of the Alps.
Contrasting levels of genetic differentiation among populations of wolverines (Gulo gulo) from northern Canada revealed by nuclear and mitochondrial loci
TLDR
Mitochondrial data provide evidence that wolverines in Canada are genetically structured due to female philopatry, and highlight the importance of examining both nuclear and mitochondrial loci when attempting to elucidate patterns of genetic structure.
Population structure of California coyotes corresponds to habitat‐specific breaks and illuminates species history
TLDR
The finding that genetic subdivisions were associated with unobstructed boundaries between contiguous habitats suggests a role for intraspecific variability in habitat affinities as a factor underlying genetic structure.
Ecological and genetic spatial structuring in the Canadian lynx
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the Rocky Mountains represent a barrier to gene flow in western Canada, and the presence of a geographically invisible barrier south of Hudson Bay is detected.
Habitat barriers limit gene flow and illuminate historical events in a wide‐ranging carnivore, the American puma
TLDR
Northern pumas showed both reduced genetic diversity and greater divergence from a hypothetical ancestral population based on Bayesian clustering analyses, possibly reflecting a post‐Pleistocene range expansion.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...