Ecological effects of large fires on US landscapes: benefit or catastrophe?

@article{Keane2008EcologicalEO,
  title={Ecological effects of large fires on US landscapes: benefit or catastrophe?},
  author={R. Keane and J. Agee and P. Ful{\'e} and J. Keeley and C. H. Key and S. Kitchen and R. Miller and L. A. Schulte},
  journal={International Journal of Wildland Fire},
  year={2008},
  volume={17},
  pages={696-712}
}
  • R. Keane, J. Agee, +5 authors L. A. Schulte
  • Published 2008
  • Geography
  • International Journal of Wildland Fire
  • The perception is that today's large fires are an ecological catastrophe because they burn vast areas with high intensities and severities. However, little is known of the ecological impacts of large fires on both historical and contemporary landscapes. The present paper presents a review of the current knowledge of the effects of large fires in the United States by important ecosystems written by regional experts. The ecosystems are (1) ponderosa pine-Douglas-fir, (2) sagebrush-grasslands, (3… CONTINUE READING

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