Ecological correlates of vulnerability to fragmentation in Neotropical bats

@article{Meyer2007EcologicalCO,
  title={Ecological correlates of vulnerability to fragmentation in Neotropical bats},
  author={Christoph F. J. Meyer and Jochen Fr{\"u}nd and Willy Pineda Lizano and Elisabeth Klara Viktoria Kalko},
  journal={Journal of Applied Ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={45},
  pages={381-391}
}
Summary 1. In the face of widespread human-induced habitat fragmentation, identification of those ecological characteristics that render some species more vulnerable to fragmentation than others is vital for understanding, predicting and mitigating the effects of habitat alteration on biodiversity. We compare hypotheses on the causes of interspecific differences in fragmentation sensitivity using distribution and abundance data collected on 23 species of Neotropical bats. 2. Bats were captured… Expand

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