Ecological characteristics in habitats of two African mole‐rat species with different social systems in an area of sympatry: implications for the mole‐rat social evolution

@article{Lvy2012EcologicalCI,
  title={Ecological characteristics in habitats of two African mole‐rat species with different social systems in an area of sympatry: implications for the mole‐rat social evolution},
  author={Matěj L{\"o}vy and Jan {\vS}kl{\'i}ba and Hynek Burda and Wilbert N. Chitaukali and Radim {\vS}umbera},
  journal={Journal of Zoology},
  year={2012},
  volume={286},
  pages={145-153}
}
African mole-rats (Bathyergidae) are subterranean rodents with diverse social systems, which range from solitary to highly cooperative. The social systems are thought to reflect ecological conditions. We examined ecological characteristics in habitats occupied by two mole-rat species with different social systems in an area of sympatry in the Nyika Plateau, Malawi. Whereas the solitary silvery mole-rat Heliophobius argenteocinereus occurs there in the afromontane grasslands, the social Whyte's… Expand
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